DIY Pie Chart Templates for Teachers | Student Handouts
 
Welcome to www.studenthandouts.com! We hope that you enjoy our thousands of free educational materials for kindergarten through high school. If you have any questions or suggestions, send us a message at webmaster@studenthandouts.com.

 
DIY Pie Charts with 1-30 Pieces
Free Printable Templates for Worksheets - Scroll Down to Print (PDFs) - Graphic Organizers - Relationships
 
 
In a hurry, and need an accurate pie chart for a worksheet, use on a smart board, or other classroom project? Click on the pie chart of your choice. A larger image will open, which you can print, save for later use, or copy/paste onto your project. Enjoy!
 
 
  Empty Pie Chart (circle/1 section/whole)   Pie Chart with Two Equal Sections   3 section pie chart   Pie Chart with Four Equal Sections   Five section pie chart  
  Empty Pie Chart (Blank Circle, or One Section)   Pie Chart with 2 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 3 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 4 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 5 Equal Sections  
 
 
  Pie Chart with Six Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Seven Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Eight Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Nine Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Ten Equal Sections  
  Pie Chart with 6 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 7 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 8 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 9 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 10 Equal Sections  
 
 
  Pie Chart with Eleven Sections   Pie Chart with Twelve Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Thirteen Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Fourteen Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Fifteen Equal Sections  
  Pie Chart with 11 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 12 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 13 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 14 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 15 Equal Sections  
 
 
  Pie Chart with Sixteen Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Seventeen Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 18 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 19 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Twenty Equal Sections  
  Pie Chart with 16 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 17 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 18 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 19 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 20 Equal Sections  
 
 
  Pie Chart with Twenty-one Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Twenty-two Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Twenty-three Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Twenty-four Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Twenty-five Equal Sections  
  Pie Chart with 21 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 22 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 23 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 24 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 25 Equal Sections  
 
 
  Pie Chart with Twenty-six Equal Sections   Pie Chart with Twenty-seven Equal Sections/Pieces   Pie CHart with Twenty-eight Equal Pieces   Pie Chart with Twenty-nine Equal Pieces   Pie Chart with Thirty Equal Sections  
  Pie Chart with 26 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 27 Equal Pieces   Pie Chart with 28 Equal Pieces   Pie Chart with 29 Equal Sections   Pie Chart with 30 Equal Sections  
 
 
 
 
Click here for our vast selection of free printable graphic organizers.
 
 
Ideas for Using Our Pie Charts
 
  • The most obvious usage for our pie charts is in teaching fractions in math class. Using a smart board, it is easy to illustrate to kids that 1/3 is the same as 3/9 by shading a pie chart.
  • Try introducing the concept of fractions and pie charts by using the class (or family) as an example. Say that there are 27 students, a teacher, and a teacher's aide, for a grand total of 29 people working and learning in the classroom--the "class." Print the pie chart with 29 sections, then cut apart the pieces. Have each person write her/his name on a section, then reassemble the chart. Students will see that each person in the room is an integral part of the class. Later, you can expand upon this concept by illustrating that 2/29 are adult educators. Maybe 5/29 are members of the band, 8/29 play a musical instrument, 14/29 are male, etc.
  • Have each student gather data from members of the classroom to create their own pie charts. Each student can conduct her/his own research and arrange it on a pie chart for classroom display. Possible research topics could include numbers of siblings (i.e., % are only children, % percent have one sibling, % have two siblings), how many Harry Potter books students have read, etc. This is a great activity because not only are students learning to use pie charts and fractions, but they are learning to conduct research and to present facts rather than opinions or conjectures. That is, a student who has read and enjoyed the Harry Potter books may assume that "everyone" either has or hasn't read them, or that "every" family serves cornbread at Thanksgiving, or that "all" kids hate green beans. The exercise can be a real eye-opener about the problems inherent in making assumptions based on biased observations and anecdotal evidence, flawed forms of logic which are at odds with the CCSS and scientific reasoning.